Sam looked around anxiously, but Craster had not returned to the hall. If he had, things might have grown ugly. The wildling hated bastards, though the rangers said he was baseborn himself, fathered on a wildling woman by some long-dead crow.  “Craster’s got his own to feed,” said Giant. kowloon walled city park

“All these women. He’s given us what he can.”  “Don’t you bloody believe it. The day we leave, he’ll tap a keg o’ mead and sit down to feast on ham and honey. And laugh at us, out starving in the snow. He’s a bloody wildling, is all he is. There’s none o’ them friends of the Watch.” He kicked at Bannen’s corpse. “Ask him if you don’t believe me.”  They burned the ranger’s corpse at sunset, in the fire that Grenn had been feeding earlier that day. Tim Stone and Garth of Oldtown carried out the naked corpse and swung him twice between them before heaving him into the flames. The surviving brothers divided up his clothes, his weapons, his armor, and everything else he owned. At Castle Black, the Night’s Watch buried its dead with all due ceremony. They were not at Castle Black, though. And bones do not come back as wights.  “His name was Bannen,” Lord Commander Mormont said, as the flames took him. “He was a brave man, a good ranger. He came to us from... where did he come from?”  “Down White Harbor way,” someone called out.  Mormont nodded. “He came to us from White Harbor, and never failed in his duty formaldehyde. He kept his vows as best he could, rode far, fought fiercely. We shall never see his like again.” 

“And now his watch is ended,” the black brothers said, in solemn chant.  “And now his watch is ended,” Mormont echoed.  “Ended,” cried his raven. “Ended.”  Sam was red-eyed and sick from the smoke. When he looked at the fire, he thought he saw Bannen sitting up, his hands coiling into fists as if to fight off the flames that were consuming him, but it was only for an instant, before the swirling smoke hid all. The worst thing was the smell, though. If it had been a foul unpleasant smell he might have stood it, but his burning brother smelled so much like roast pork that Sam’s mouth began to water, and that was so horrible that as soon as the bird squawked “Ended” he ran  in the ditch.  He was there on his knees in the mud when Dolorous Edd came up. “Digging for worms, Sam? Or are you just sick?”  “Sick,” said Sam weakly, wiping his mouth with the back of his hand. “The smell...” 

“Never knew Bannen could smell so good.” Edd’s tone was as morose as ever. “I had half a mind to carve a slice off him. If we had some applesauce, I might have done it. Pork’s always best with applesauce, I find.” Edd undid his laces and pulled out his cock. “You best not die, Sam, or I fear I might succumb. There’s bound to be more crackling on you than Bannen ever had, and I never could resist a bit of crackling.” He sighed as his piss arced out, yellow and steaming. “We ride at first light, did you hear? Sun or snow, the Old Bear tells me.”  Sun or snow. Sam glanced up anxiously at the sky. “Snow?” he squeaked. “We... ride HKBU BBA? All of us?”  “Well, no, some will need to walk.” He shook himself.